Popular Chapters

Proverbs Chapter 28

The wicked flee when no man pursueth but the righteous are bold as a lion. For the transgression of a land many are the princes thereof but by a man of understanding and knowledge the state thereof shall be prolonged. A poor man that oppresseth the poor is like a sweeping rain which leave... [More]

deuteronomy31-6.com

deuteronomy31-6.com Bible Website

Daily Bible Verses

And it came to pass in the twelfth year of our captivity, in the tenth month, in the fifth day of the month, that one that had escaped out of Jerusalem came unto me, saying, The city is smitten.

Audio Chapters

Videos

It Will Cost You Everything - Steve Lawson

Salvation through the narrow gate is worth it. Let us count the cost in advance!

Why We Are Afraid Of Islam - By Dr Bill Warner

Expose of 1400 years of underreported history

The Danger Of Tongues

Why you might not want to speak in tongues



Email This To A Friend

Tell a friend:







Title: Charles G. Finney - Autobiography


Author: Finney, Charles G.



The author of the following narrative sufficiently explains its origin and purpose, in the introductory pages. He left the manuscript at the disposal of his family, having never decided, in his own mind, that it was desirable to publish it. Many of his friends, becoming aware of its existence, have urged its publication; and his children, yielding to the general demand, have presented the manuscript to Oberlin College for this purpose. In giving it to the public, it is manifestly necessary to present it essentially as we find it. No liberties can be taken with it, to modify views or statements which may sometimes seem extreme or partial, or even to subdue a style, which, though rugged at times, is always dramatic and forcible. Few men have better earned the right to utter their own thoughts, in their own words. These thoughts and words are what the many friends of Mr. Finney will desire. The only changes that seemed allowable, were occasional omissions, to avoid unnecessary repetition, or too minute detail, or, at times, references that might seem too distinctly personal. The narrative is, in its very nature, personal, involving the experiences both of the author and of those with whom he had to do; and to these personal experiences it, in great part, owes its interest and its value. As the narrative presents the memories and heart-yearnings of a veteran pastor, with a passion for winning souls, it is hoped and believed that, in its personal references, it will not be regarded as having transcended the limits of Christian propriety. For the most part, the lapse of time sets aside all question.